Frequently Asked Questions

Suspension.org is a website for those interested in the art and technical aspects of body suspension and the responsible disseminationof information pertaining to such. It is not designed to encourage people to attempt any dangerous activities.
The act of suspension is hanging the human body from (or partially from) hooks pierced through the flesh in various places around the body.
There are many different reasons to suspend, from pure adrenaline or endorphin rush, to conquering ones fears, to trying to reach a new level of spiritual consciousness and everything in between. In general, people suspend to attain some sort of “experience”.
Some people are seeking the opportunity to discover a deeper sense of themselves and to challenge pre-determined belief systems which may not be true. Some are seeking a rite of passage or a spiritual encounter to let go of the fear of not being whole or complete inside their body.
Others are looking for control over their body, or seek to prove to themselves that they are more than their bodies, or are not their bodies at all. Others simply seek to explore the unknown.
Old FAQ
This FAQ was originally compiled by and copyright (c) 2002 BMEZINE.COM Inc. For more on suspension and other ritual, visit http://www.bmezine.com/
Please note that this is/was an entirely preliminary version of this FAQ. As of July 2009, a team of people has begun rewritting the FAQ. If you would like to help please drop an email to isa@suspension.org
Version: 0.01
Date: 01-15-2002

INTRODUCTION

Hooks rarely tear out BUT in the event that one does or if the skin is torn, it is best to have a suture kit on hand to sew the wound shut.

Drug use can have a severe physical and mental impact on an individual. People should avoid any drugs that affect the immune system, blood pressure and/or impair the mental abilities of the individual. That said, many cultures have traditionally combined suspension with psychedelic, psychotropic, and “mind expanding” drugs to further their spiritual quests. However, as far as we in the West are concerned, this is highly uncharted territory and extreme care should be taken if you choose to combine these activities.

Alcohol weakens and dehydrates the body and thins the blood — it is recommended that alcohol not be combined with suspension. Use of alcohol should be avoided for at least 24-72 hours priors to suspending. In fact, many people abstain from alcohol for as long as a week. In general alcohol dulls and takes away from the experience of suspension.

Objects such as needles and hooks should be placed into sharps (solid plastic biohazard) containers to be disposed as mandated by your local government. As for blood soaked trash, in the US, most states have different rules as to whether the material must be treated as biohazardous or simply contaminated waste. Any local reputable piercing/tattoo studio should be able to answer your questions regarding material disposal.

First of all, the piercers must to have access to hot and cold running water. As for field preparation, it is best to work off of smooth hard surfaces that can be easily cleaned and then covered with disposable surfaces such as dental bibs. The biggest problem with field suspensions is limited supplies and cross contamination. The piercers must be very careful to separate the fields into clean, working, and contaminated areas.

There are many levels of shock that can go from dangerous to life threatening very quickly. If the body is cold, raise the temperature. If the person is hot, lower their temperature with cold compresses. Of course remember the old adage, “the face is red, raise the head; the face is pale, raise the tail.”

Loss of consciousness is one of the most common side effects of suspension and can be very dangerous. In responsible suspension, a person should not be suspended unless they are completely lucid. While hanging, if the person faints, they should be lowered quickly (but not necessarily unhooked). Once the person regains consciousness, administering water and sugar in a liquid form will help to raise glucose levels in the blood, and they can decide if they’d like to give it another try.

First, fully understanding the medical background of an individual will greatly reduce the risks (so I will point out again here that if you are approaching a suspension team to help you suspend, you MUST inform them fully of your health). In addition, working in an environment where the temperature can be controlled, with plenty of juice and water as well as a trained medical personal on staff will greatly reduce chances of shock (and greatly reduce the risk if it does happen).

People suffering from high (or low) blood pressure, heart conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, immune deficiency, hepatitis, blood clotting problems, and individuals that have experienced multiple states of extreme shock should seek the advice of their physician before suspending. If you suffer from any medical conditions it is essential that the people helping you are entirely aware of them.

The potential risks are significant, and include but are not limited to death, extreme shock, convulsions, dizziness, pain, bleeding, loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, scarring, and numbness.

STYLES OF SUSPENSIONS

Hooks rarely tear out BUT in the event that one does or if the skin is torn, it is best to have a suture kit on hand to sew the wound shut.

Drug use can have a severe physical and mental impact on an individual. People should avoid any drugs that affect the immune system, blood pressure and/or impair the mental abilities of the individual. That said, many cultures have traditionally combined suspension with psychedelic, psychotropic, and “mind expanding” drugs to further their spiritual quests. However, as far as we in the West are concerned, this is highly uncharted territory and extreme care should be taken if you choose to combine these activities.

Alcohol weakens and dehydrates the body and thins the blood — it is recommended that alcohol not be combined with suspension. Use of alcohol should be avoided for at least 24-72 hours priors to suspending. In fact, many people abstain from alcohol for as long as a week. In general alcohol dulls and takes away from the experience of suspension.

Objects such as needles and hooks should be placed into sharps (solid plastic biohazard) containers to be disposed as mandated by your local government. As for blood soaked trash, in the US, most states have different rules as to whether the material must be treated as biohazardous or simply contaminated waste. Any local reputable piercing/tattoo studio should be able to answer your questions regarding material disposal.

First of all, the piercers must to have access to hot and cold running water. As for field preparation, it is best to work off of smooth hard surfaces that can be easily cleaned and then covered with disposable surfaces such as dental bibs. The biggest problem with field suspensions is limited supplies and cross contamination. The piercers must be very careful to separate the fields into clean, working, and contaminated areas.

There are many levels of shock that can go from dangerous to life threatening very quickly. If the body is cold, raise the temperature. If the person is hot, lower their temperature with cold compresses. Of course remember the old adage, “the face is red, raise the head; the face is pale, raise the tail.”

Loss of consciousness is one of the most common side effects of suspension and can be very dangerous. In responsible suspension, a person should not be suspended unless they are completely lucid. While hanging, if the person faints, they should be lowered quickly (but not necessarily unhooked). Once the person regains consciousness, administering water and sugar in a liquid form will help to raise glucose levels in the blood, and they can decide if they’d like to give it another try.

First, fully understanding the medical background of an individual will greatly reduce the risks (so I will point out again here that if you are approaching a suspension team to help you suspend, you MUST inform them fully of your health). In addition, working in an environment where the temperature can be controlled, with plenty of juice and water as well as a trained medical personal on staff will greatly reduce chances of shock (and greatly reduce the risk if it does happen).

People suffering from high (or low) blood pressure, heart conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, immune deficiency, hepatitis, blood clotting problems, and individuals that have experienced multiple states of extreme shock should seek the advice of their physician before suspending. If you suffer from any medical conditions it is essential that the people helping you are entirely aware of them.

The potential risks are significant, and include but are not limited to death, extreme shock, convulsions, dizziness, pain, bleeding, loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, scarring, and numbness.

HISTORICAL CONTEXT

Hooks rarely tear out BUT in the event that one does or if the skin is torn, it is best to have a suture kit on hand to sew the wound shut.

Drug use can have a severe physical and mental impact on an individual. People should avoid any drugs that affect the immune system, blood pressure and/or impair the mental abilities of the individual. That said, many cultures have traditionally combined suspension with psychedelic, psychotropic, and “mind expanding” drugs to further their spiritual quests. However, as far as we in the West are concerned, this is highly uncharted territory and extreme care should be taken if you choose to combine these activities.

Alcohol weakens and dehydrates the body and thins the blood — it is recommended that alcohol not be combined with suspension. Use of alcohol should be avoided for at least 24-72 hours priors to suspending. In fact, many people abstain from alcohol for as long as a week. In general alcohol dulls and takes away from the experience of suspension.

Objects such as needles and hooks should be placed into sharps (solid plastic biohazard) containers to be disposed as mandated by your local government. As for blood soaked trash, in the US, most states have different rules as to whether the material must be treated as biohazardous or simply contaminated waste. Any local reputable piercing/tattoo studio should be able to answer your questions regarding material disposal.

First of all, the piercers must to have access to hot and cold running water. As for field preparation, it is best to work off of smooth hard surfaces that can be easily cleaned and then covered with disposable surfaces such as dental bibs. The biggest problem with field suspensions is limited supplies and cross contamination. The piercers must be very careful to separate the fields into clean, working, and contaminated areas.

There are many levels of shock that can go from dangerous to life threatening very quickly. If the body is cold, raise the temperature. If the person is hot, lower their temperature with cold compresses. Of course remember the old adage, “the face is red, raise the head; the face is pale, raise the tail.”

Loss of consciousness is one of the most common side effects of suspension and can be very dangerous. In responsible suspension, a person should not be suspended unless they are completely lucid. While hanging, if the person faints, they should be lowered quickly (but not necessarily unhooked). Once the person regains consciousness, administering water and sugar in a liquid form will help to raise glucose levels in the blood, and they can decide if they’d like to give it another try.

First, fully understanding the medical background of an individual will greatly reduce the risks (so I will point out again here that if you are approaching a suspension team to help you suspend, you MUST inform them fully of your health). In addition, working in an environment where the temperature can be controlled, with plenty of juice and water as well as a trained medical personal on staff will greatly reduce chances of shock (and greatly reduce the risk if it does happen).

People suffering from high (or low) blood pressure, heart conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, immune deficiency, hepatitis, blood clotting problems, and individuals that have experienced multiple states of extreme shock should seek the advice of their physician before suspending. If you suffer from any medical conditions it is essential that the people helping you are entirely aware of them.

The potential risks are significant, and include but are not limited to death, extreme shock, convulsions, dizziness, pain, bleeding, loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, scarring, and numbness.

HOOKS AND THEIR APPLICATION

Hooks rarely tear out BUT in the event that one does or if the skin is torn, it is best to have a suture kit on hand to sew the wound shut.

Drug use can have a severe physical and mental impact on an individual. People should avoid any drugs that affect the immune system, blood pressure and/or impair the mental abilities of the individual. That said, many cultures have traditionally combined suspension with psychedelic, psychotropic, and “mind expanding” drugs to further their spiritual quests. However, as far as we in the West are concerned, this is highly uncharted territory and extreme care should be taken if you choose to combine these activities.

Alcohol weakens and dehydrates the body and thins the blood — it is recommended that alcohol not be combined with suspension. Use of alcohol should be avoided for at least 24-72 hours priors to suspending. In fact, many people abstain from alcohol for as long as a week. In general alcohol dulls and takes away from the experience of suspension.

Objects such as needles and hooks should be placed into sharps (solid plastic biohazard) containers to be disposed as mandated by your local government. As for blood soaked trash, in the US, most states have different rules as to whether the material must be treated as biohazardous or simply contaminated waste. Any local reputable piercing/tattoo studio should be able to answer your questions regarding material disposal.

First of all, the piercers must to have access to hot and cold running water. As for field preparation, it is best to work off of smooth hard surfaces that can be easily cleaned and then covered with disposable surfaces such as dental bibs. The biggest problem with field suspensions is limited supplies and cross contamination. The piercers must be very careful to separate the fields into clean, working, and contaminated areas.

There are many levels of shock that can go from dangerous to life threatening very quickly. If the body is cold, raise the temperature. If the person is hot, lower their temperature with cold compresses. Of course remember the old adage, “the face is red, raise the head; the face is pale, raise the tail.”

Loss of consciousness is one of the most common side effects of suspension and can be very dangerous. In responsible suspension, a person should not be suspended unless they are completely lucid. While hanging, if the person faints, they should be lowered quickly (but not necessarily unhooked). Once the person regains consciousness, administering water and sugar in a liquid form will help to raise glucose levels in the blood, and they can decide if they’d like to give it another try.

First, fully understanding the medical background of an individual will greatly reduce the risks (so I will point out again here that if you are approaching a suspension team to help you suspend, you MUST inform them fully of your health). In addition, working in an environment where the temperature can be controlled, with plenty of juice and water as well as a trained medical personal on staff will greatly reduce chances of shock (and greatly reduce the risk if it does happen).

People suffering from high (or low) blood pressure, heart conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, immune deficiency, hepatitis, blood clotting problems, and individuals that have experienced multiple states of extreme shock should seek the advice of their physician before suspending. If you suffer from any medical conditions it is essential that the people helping you are entirely aware of them.

The potential risks are significant, and include but are not limited to death, extreme shock, convulsions, dizziness, pain, bleeding, loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, scarring, and numbness.

ROPES AND RIGGING

Hooks rarely tear out BUT in the event that one does or if the skin is torn, it is best to have a suture kit on hand to sew the wound shut.

Drug use can have a severe physical and mental impact on an individual. People should avoid any drugs that affect the immune system, blood pressure and/or impair the mental abilities of the individual. That said, many cultures have traditionally combined suspension with psychedelic, psychotropic, and “mind expanding” drugs to further their spiritual quests. However, as far as we in the West are concerned, this is highly uncharted territory and extreme care should be taken if you choose to combine these activities.

Alcohol weakens and dehydrates the body and thins the blood — it is recommended that alcohol not be combined with suspension. Use of alcohol should be avoided for at least 24-72 hours priors to suspending. In fact, many people abstain from alcohol for as long as a week. In general alcohol dulls and takes away from the experience of suspension.

Objects such as needles and hooks should be placed into sharps (solid plastic biohazard) containers to be disposed as mandated by your local government. As for blood soaked trash, in the US, most states have different rules as to whether the material must be treated as biohazardous or simply contaminated waste. Any local reputable piercing/tattoo studio should be able to answer your questions regarding material disposal.

First of all, the piercers must to have access to hot and cold running water. As for field preparation, it is best to work off of smooth hard surfaces that can be easily cleaned and then covered with disposable surfaces such as dental bibs. The biggest problem with field suspensions is limited supplies and cross contamination. The piercers must be very careful to separate the fields into clean, working, and contaminated areas.

There are many levels of shock that can go from dangerous to life threatening very quickly. If the body is cold, raise the temperature. If the person is hot, lower their temperature with cold compresses. Of course remember the old adage, “the face is red, raise the head; the face is pale, raise the tail.”

Loss of consciousness is one of the most common side effects of suspension and can be very dangerous. In responsible suspension, a person should not be suspended unless they are completely lucid. While hanging, if the person faints, they should be lowered quickly (but not necessarily unhooked). Once the person regains consciousness, administering water and sugar in a liquid form will help to raise glucose levels in the blood, and they can decide if they’d like to give it another try.

First, fully understanding the medical background of an individual will greatly reduce the risks (so I will point out again here that if you are approaching a suspension team to help you suspend, you MUST inform them fully of your health). In addition, working in an environment where the temperature can be controlled, with plenty of juice and water as well as a trained medical personal on staff will greatly reduce chances of shock (and greatly reduce the risk if it does happen).

People suffering from high (or low) blood pressure, heart conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, immune deficiency, hepatitis, blood clotting problems, and individuals that have experienced multiple states of extreme shock should seek the advice of their physician before suspending. If you suffer from any medical conditions it is essential that the people helping you are entirely aware of them.

The potential risks are significant, and include but are not limited to death, extreme shock, convulsions, dizziness, pain, bleeding, loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, scarring, and numbness.

PREPARATION AND AFTERCARE: MENTAL, PHYSICAL, SPIRITUAL

Hooks rarely tear out BUT in the event that one does or if the skin is torn, it is best to have a suture kit on hand to sew the wound shut.

Drug use can have a severe physical and mental impact on an individual. People should avoid any drugs that affect the immune system, blood pressure and/or impair the mental abilities of the individual. That said, many cultures have traditionally combined suspension with psychedelic, psychotropic, and “mind expanding” drugs to further their spiritual quests. However, as far as we in the West are concerned, this is highly uncharted territory and extreme care should be taken if you choose to combine these activities.

Alcohol weakens and dehydrates the body and thins the blood — it is recommended that alcohol not be combined with suspension. Use of alcohol should be avoided for at least 24-72 hours priors to suspending. In fact, many people abstain from alcohol for as long as a week. In general alcohol dulls and takes away from the experience of suspension.

Objects such as needles and hooks should be placed into sharps (solid plastic biohazard) containers to be disposed as mandated by your local government. As for blood soaked trash, in the US, most states have different rules as to whether the material must be treated as biohazardous or simply contaminated waste. Any local reputable piercing/tattoo studio should be able to answer your questions regarding material disposal.

First of all, the piercers must to have access to hot and cold running water. As for field preparation, it is best to work off of smooth hard surfaces that can be easily cleaned and then covered with disposable surfaces such as dental bibs. The biggest problem with field suspensions is limited supplies and cross contamination. The piercers must be very careful to separate the fields into clean, working, and contaminated areas.

There are many levels of shock that can go from dangerous to life threatening very quickly. If the body is cold, raise the temperature. If the person is hot, lower their temperature with cold compresses. Of course remember the old adage, “the face is red, raise the head; the face is pale, raise the tail.”

Loss of consciousness is one of the most common side effects of suspension and can be very dangerous. In responsible suspension, a person should not be suspended unless they are completely lucid. While hanging, if the person faints, they should be lowered quickly (but not necessarily unhooked). Once the person regains consciousness, administering water and sugar in a liquid form will help to raise glucose levels in the blood, and they can decide if they’d like to give it another try.

First, fully understanding the medical background of an individual will greatly reduce the risks (so I will point out again here that if you are approaching a suspension team to help you suspend, you MUST inform them fully of your health). In addition, working in an environment where the temperature can be controlled, with plenty of juice and water as well as a trained medical personal on staff will greatly reduce chances of shock (and greatly reduce the risk if it does happen).

People suffering from high (or low) blood pressure, heart conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, immune deficiency, hepatitis, blood clotting problems, and individuals that have experienced multiple states of extreme shock should seek the advice of their physician before suspending. If you suffer from any medical conditions it is essential that the people helping you are entirely aware of them.

The potential risks are significant, and include but are not limited to death, extreme shock, convulsions, dizziness, pain, bleeding, loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, scarring, and numbness.

RISKS AND SAFETY

Hooks rarely tear out BUT in the event that one does or if the skin is torn, it is best to have a suture kit on hand to sew the wound shut.

Drug use can have a severe physical and mental impact on an individual. People should avoid any drugs that affect the immune system, blood pressure and/or impair the mental abilities of the individual. That said, many cultures have traditionally combined suspension with psychedelic, psychotropic, and “mind expanding” drugs to further their spiritual quests. However, as far as we in the West are concerned, this is highly uncharted territory and extreme care should be taken if you choose to combine these activities.

Alcohol weakens and dehydrates the body and thins the blood — it is recommended that alcohol not be combined with suspension. Use of alcohol should be avoided for at least 24-72 hours priors to suspending. In fact, many people abstain from alcohol for as long as a week. In general alcohol dulls and takes away from the experience of suspension.

Objects such as needles and hooks should be placed into sharps (solid plastic biohazard) containers to be disposed as mandated by your local government. As for blood soaked trash, in the US, most states have different rules as to whether the material must be treated as biohazardous or simply contaminated waste. Any local reputable piercing/tattoo studio should be able to answer your questions regarding material disposal.

First of all, the piercers must to have access to hot and cold running water. As for field preparation, it is best to work off of smooth hard surfaces that can be easily cleaned and then covered with disposable surfaces such as dental bibs. The biggest problem with field suspensions is limited supplies and cross contamination. The piercers must be very careful to separate the fields into clean, working, and contaminated areas.

There are many levels of shock that can go from dangerous to life threatening very quickly. If the body is cold, raise the temperature. If the person is hot, lower their temperature with cold compresses. Of course remember the old adage, “the face is red, raise the head; the face is pale, raise the tail.”

Loss of consciousness is one of the most common side effects of suspension and can be very dangerous. In responsible suspension, a person should not be suspended unless they are completely lucid. While hanging, if the person faints, they should be lowered quickly (but not necessarily unhooked). Once the person regains consciousness, administering water and sugar in a liquid form will help to raise glucose levels in the blood, and they can decide if they’d like to give it another try.

First, fully understanding the medical background of an individual will greatly reduce the risks (so I will point out again here that if you are approaching a suspension team to help you suspend, you MUST inform them fully of your health). In addition, working in an environment where the temperature can be controlled, with plenty of juice and water as well as a trained medical personal on staff will greatly reduce chances of shock (and greatly reduce the risk if it does happen).

People suffering from high (or low) blood pressure, heart conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, immune deficiency, hepatitis, blood clotting problems, and individuals that have experienced multiple states of extreme shock should seek the advice of their physician before suspending. If you suffer from any medical conditions it is essential that the people helping you are entirely aware of them.

The potential risks are significant, and include but are not limited to death, extreme shock, convulsions, dizziness, pain, bleeding, loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, scarring, and numbness.

MISCELLANEOUS QUESTIONS

Hooks rarely tear out BUT in the event that one does or if the skin is torn, it is best to have a suture kit on hand to sew the wound shut.

Drug use can have a severe physical and mental impact on an individual. People should avoid any drugs that affect the immune system, blood pressure and/or impair the mental abilities of the individual. That said, many cultures have traditionally combined suspension with psychedelic, psychotropic, and “mind expanding” drugs to further their spiritual quests. However, as far as we in the West are concerned, this is highly uncharted territory and extreme care should be taken if you choose to combine these activities.

Alcohol weakens and dehydrates the body and thins the blood — it is recommended that alcohol not be combined with suspension. Use of alcohol should be avoided for at least 24-72 hours priors to suspending. In fact, many people abstain from alcohol for as long as a week. In general alcohol dulls and takes away from the experience of suspension.

Objects such as needles and hooks should be placed into sharps (solid plastic biohazard) containers to be disposed as mandated by your local government. As for blood soaked trash, in the US, most states have different rules as to whether the material must be treated as biohazardous or simply contaminated waste. Any local reputable piercing/tattoo studio should be able to answer your questions regarding material disposal.

First of all, the piercers must to have access to hot and cold running water. As for field preparation, it is best to work off of smooth hard surfaces that can be easily cleaned and then covered with disposable surfaces such as dental bibs. The biggest problem with field suspensions is limited supplies and cross contamination. The piercers must be very careful to separate the fields into clean, working, and contaminated areas.

There are many levels of shock that can go from dangerous to life threatening very quickly. If the body is cold, raise the temperature. If the person is hot, lower their temperature with cold compresses. Of course remember the old adage, “the face is red, raise the head; the face is pale, raise the tail.”

Loss of consciousness is one of the most common side effects of suspension and can be very dangerous. In responsible suspension, a person should not be suspended unless they are completely lucid. While hanging, if the person faints, they should be lowered quickly (but not necessarily unhooked). Once the person regains consciousness, administering water and sugar in a liquid form will help to raise glucose levels in the blood, and they can decide if they’d like to give it another try.

First, fully understanding the medical background of an individual will greatly reduce the risks (so I will point out again here that if you are approaching a suspension team to help you suspend, you MUST inform them fully of your health). In addition, working in an environment where the temperature can be controlled, with plenty of juice and water as well as a trained medical personal on staff will greatly reduce chances of shock (and greatly reduce the risk if it does happen).

People suffering from high (or low) blood pressure, heart conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, immune deficiency, hepatitis, blood clotting problems, and individuals that have experienced multiple states of extreme shock should seek the advice of their physician before suspending. If you suffer from any medical conditions it is essential that the people helping you are entirely aware of them.

The potential risks are significant, and include but are not limited to death, extreme shock, convulsions, dizziness, pain, bleeding, loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, scarring, and numbness.

PULLING

Hooks rarely tear out BUT in the event that one does or if the skin is torn, it is best to have a suture kit on hand to sew the wound shut.

Drug use can have a severe physical and mental impact on an individual. People should avoid any drugs that affect the immune system, blood pressure and/or impair the mental abilities of the individual. That said, many cultures have traditionally combined suspension with psychedelic, psychotropic, and “mind expanding” drugs to further their spiritual quests. However, as far as we in the West are concerned, this is highly uncharted territory and extreme care should be taken if you choose to combine these activities.

Alcohol weakens and dehydrates the body and thins the blood — it is recommended that alcohol not be combined with suspension. Use of alcohol should be avoided for at least 24-72 hours priors to suspending. In fact, many people abstain from alcohol for as long as a week. In general alcohol dulls and takes away from the experience of suspension.

Objects such as needles and hooks should be placed into sharps (solid plastic biohazard) containers to be disposed as mandated by your local government. As for blood soaked trash, in the US, most states have different rules as to whether the material must be treated as biohazardous or simply contaminated waste. Any local reputable piercing/tattoo studio should be able to answer your questions regarding material disposal.

First of all, the piercers must to have access to hot and cold running water. As for field preparation, it is best to work off of smooth hard surfaces that can be easily cleaned and then covered with disposable surfaces such as dental bibs. The biggest problem with field suspensions is limited supplies and cross contamination. The piercers must be very careful to separate the fields into clean, working, and contaminated areas.

There are many levels of shock that can go from dangerous to life threatening very quickly. If the body is cold, raise the temperature. If the person is hot, lower their temperature with cold compresses. Of course remember the old adage, “the face is red, raise the head; the face is pale, raise the tail.”

Loss of consciousness is one of the most common side effects of suspension and can be very dangerous. In responsible suspension, a person should not be suspended unless they are completely lucid. While hanging, if the person faints, they should be lowered quickly (but not necessarily unhooked). Once the person regains consciousness, administering water and sugar in a liquid form will help to raise glucose levels in the blood, and they can decide if they’d like to give it another try.

First, fully understanding the medical background of an individual will greatly reduce the risks (so I will point out again here that if you are approaching a suspension team to help you suspend, you MUST inform them fully of your health). In addition, working in an environment where the temperature can be controlled, with plenty of juice and water as well as a trained medical personal on staff will greatly reduce chances of shock (and greatly reduce the risk if it does happen).

People suffering from high (or low) blood pressure, heart conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, immune deficiency, hepatitis, blood clotting problems, and individuals that have experienced multiple states of extreme shock should seek the advice of their physician before suspending. If you suffer from any medical conditions it is essential that the people helping you are entirely aware of them.

The potential risks are significant, and include but are not limited to death, extreme shock, convulsions, dizziness, pain, bleeding, loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, scarring, and numbness.

SUPPLIERS

Hooks rarely tear out BUT in the event that one does or if the skin is torn, it is best to have a suture kit on hand to sew the wound shut.

Drug use can have a severe physical and mental impact on an individual. People should avoid any drugs that affect the immune system, blood pressure and/or impair the mental abilities of the individual. That said, many cultures have traditionally combined suspension with psychedelic, psychotropic, and “mind expanding” drugs to further their spiritual quests. However, as far as we in the West are concerned, this is highly uncharted territory and extreme care should be taken if you choose to combine these activities.

Alcohol weakens and dehydrates the body and thins the blood — it is recommended that alcohol not be combined with suspension. Use of alcohol should be avoided for at least 24-72 hours priors to suspending. In fact, many people abstain from alcohol for as long as a week. In general alcohol dulls and takes away from the experience of suspension.

Objects such as needles and hooks should be placed into sharps (solid plastic biohazard) containers to be disposed as mandated by your local government. As for blood soaked trash, in the US, most states have different rules as to whether the material must be treated as biohazardous or simply contaminated waste. Any local reputable piercing/tattoo studio should be able to answer your questions regarding material disposal.

First of all, the piercers must to have access to hot and cold running water. As for field preparation, it is best to work off of smooth hard surfaces that can be easily cleaned and then covered with disposable surfaces such as dental bibs. The biggest problem with field suspensions is limited supplies and cross contamination. The piercers must be very careful to separate the fields into clean, working, and contaminated areas.

There are many levels of shock that can go from dangerous to life threatening very quickly. If the body is cold, raise the temperature. If the person is hot, lower their temperature with cold compresses. Of course remember the old adage, “the face is red, raise the head; the face is pale, raise the tail.”

Loss of consciousness is one of the most common side effects of suspension and can be very dangerous. In responsible suspension, a person should not be suspended unless they are completely lucid. While hanging, if the person faints, they should be lowered quickly (but not necessarily unhooked). Once the person regains consciousness, administering water and sugar in a liquid form will help to raise glucose levels in the blood, and they can decide if they’d like to give it another try.

First, fully understanding the medical background of an individual will greatly reduce the risks (so I will point out again here that if you are approaching a suspension team to help you suspend, you MUST inform them fully of your health). In addition, working in an environment where the temperature can be controlled, with plenty of juice and water as well as a trained medical personal on staff will greatly reduce chances of shock (and greatly reduce the risk if it does happen).

People suffering from high (or low) blood pressure, heart conditions, epilepsy, diabetes, immune deficiency, hepatitis, blood clotting problems, and individuals that have experienced multiple states of extreme shock should seek the advice of their physician before suspending. If you suffer from any medical conditions it is essential that the people helping you are entirely aware of them.

The potential risks are significant, and include but are not limited to death, extreme shock, convulsions, dizziness, pain, bleeding, loss of consciousness, nausea, vomiting, scarring, and numbness.